Tuesday, February 19, 2013

The Satraps & Shambhala in the Kalachakra

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Earth: ས (sa)

"King Suchandra of Shambhala.....He had miraculously come to Shri Dhanyakataka from Shambhala, and he requested the Kalachakra for the entourage of listeners: the ninety-six emanated satraps of the ninety-six great lands within Shambhala, together with a limitless host of fortunate bodhisattvas, gods, demons, and others......Along with King Suchandra, 96 Satraps and emissaries from Shambhala are also said to have received the Kalachakra teachings.".....http://www.dalailama.com/teachings/kalachakra-initiations

"Since the Kalki has many queens, he has many sons and daughters. However, when the Kalki-to-be is born (it does not matter if he is the oldest son or not) there is a rain of white lotus flowers. The queen mother is a daughter of one of the 96 satraps of Shambhala. " (Newman ..1985)

"Satrap was the name given to the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid (Persian) Empires and in several of their successors, such as the Sassanid Empire and the Hellenistic empires....The word "satrap" is from an Avestan cognate to Sanskrit kṣatriya क्षत्रिय. The Old Persian xšaθrapāvan ("protector of the province"), from xšaθra ("realm" or "province") and pāvan ("protector")....The first large scale use of satrapies, or provinces, originates from the conception of the first Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great, beginning at around 530 BCE.....The satrapic administration and title were retained—even for Greco-Macedonian incumbents—by Alexander the Great, who conquered the Achaemenid Empire and even enlarged it, and by his successors, the Diadochi (and their dynasties) who carved it up, especially in the Seleucid Empire, where the satrap generally was designated as strategos.....Administration of the Sassanid Empire was considerably more centralized than that of the Parthian Empire; the semi-independent kingdoms and self-governing city states of the Parthian Empire was replaced with a system of "royal cities" which served as the seats of centrally appointed governors called shahrabs as well as the location of military garrisons.....The Western Satraps or Kshatrapas (35-405 CE) were Saka rulers of a land called Ariaca according to the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea.....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satraps

"The word Shah..... derives from the Old Iranian, Avestan xšaΘra, "power" and "command", corresponding to Sanskrit (Ancient Indian) kshatriya, "warrior". The full, Old Persian title of the Achaemenid rulers of the First Persian Empire was XšāyaΘiya XšāyaΘiyānām, "King of Kings"."......Satrap, the term in Western languages for a governor of a Persian province, is a distortion of xšaθrapāvan, literally "guardian of the realm", which derives from the word xšaθra, an Old Persian word meaning "realm, province" and related etymologically to shah."....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shah

Eastern Satraps After Alexander....

The term "Sakyong" literally means "earth-protector" in Tibetan, although it is colloquially understood to mean "king".

"Bactria was a satrapy of the Achaemenid Empire under the reign of Cyrus the Great. Although the first mention of Bactria comes in 520 BCE at the Behistun inscription. Bactria was a special satrapy in that it was ruled by a crown prince or an intended heir. The capital of Bactria was Bactra, and the region also sometimes included Sogdia. During the reign of Darius the Great, the Bactrians and the otherwise unknown Aeglians were placed one tax district, which was supposed to pay 360 talents every year..The Behistun Inscription (also Bistun or Bisutun, Modern Persian: بیستون < Old Persian: Bagastana, meaning "the place of god") is a multi-lingual inscription located on Mount Behistun in the Kermanshah Province of Iran, near the city of Kermanshah in western Iran........"...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bactria_(satrapy)

Click on the map to enlarge.

"BESSOS....Satrap of Bactria and last Achaemenid king (ca. 336-329 BC). From his capital at Bactra (Zariaspa), in the area of modern Balḵ, Bessos exercised control over Bactria, Sogdia to the north, and border regions of India.....At Bactra (Balkh), in the autumn of 330, Bessos donned royal robes and upright tiara, and assumed the royal name Artaxerxes V, king of unoccupied eastern Iran and Central Asia

"Darius I (550–486 BCE) was born as the eldest of five sons to Hystaspes and Rhodugune in 550 BCE. Hystaspes was a leading figure of authority in Persia, which was the homeland of the Persians. Darius's inscription states that his father was satrap of Bactria in 522 BCE. According to Herodotus, Hystaspes was the satrap of Persis, although most historians state that this is an error. Also according to Herodotus (III.139), Darius, prior to seizing power and "of no consequence at the time", had served as a spearman (doryphoros) in the Egyptian campaign (528–525 BCE) of Cambyses II, then the Persian Great King. Hystaspes was an officer in Cyrus's army and a noble of his court."....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darius_I

"The word "satrap" is from an Avestan cognate to Sanskrit kṣatriya क्षत्रिय. The Old Persian xšaθrapāvan ("protector of the province"), from xšaθra ("realm" or "province") and pāvan ("protector"). In Greek, the word was rendered as σατράπης, satrápēs, and was romanized as satrapes, from the Old Persian xšaθrapā(van)). In modern Persian this would have naturally evolved to شهربان (shahrbān). "Sharbān", translated from modern Persian, literally means "town keeper"; (شهر "shahr", meaning "town", بان "bān" meaning "keeper"). The word is likely ultimately derived from ancient Sanskrit."......http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satrap

"The first large scale use of satrapies, or provinces, originates from the conception of the first Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great, beginning at around 530 BCE. However, Provincial organization originated during the Median era from at least 648 BCE.....Up to the time of the conquest of Media by Cyrus the Great, emperors ruled the conquered lands, through client kings and governors. The chief difference was that in Persian culture the concept of kingship was indivisible from divinity: divine authority validated the divine right of kings. The twenty satraps established by Cyrus were never kings, but viceroys ruling in the king's name, although in political reality many grabbed any chance to carve themselves an independent power base. Darius the Great gave the satrapies a definitive organization, increased their number to twenty-three and fixed their annual tribute (Behistun inscription)......The satrap was himself surrounded by an all-but-royal court.....The Western Satraps or Kshatrapas (35-405 AD) were Saka rulers of a land called Ariaca according to the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, in the western and central part of the Indian subcontinent, today the Saurashtra and Malwa regions of India. They were successors to the Indo-Scythians, and were contemporaneous with the Kushans who ruled the northern part of the subcontinent from the area of Mathura and were possibly their overlords, and with the Satavahana (Andhra) who ruled in central India.".....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satrap

"Darius I (Old Persian: Dārayava(h)uš; 550–486 BCE) was the third king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire........Darius organized the empire by dividing it into provinces and placing satraps to govern it. He organized a new uniform monetary system, along with making Aramaic the official language of the empire. Darius also worked on construction projects throughout the empire, focusing on Susa, Pasargadae, Persepolis, Babylon and Egypt.".....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darius_I

"Darius wanted to organize the loosely organized empire with a system of taxation he inherited from Cyrus and Cambyses. To do this, Darius created twenty provinces called satrapies (or archi) which were each assigned to a satrap (archon) and specified fixed tributes that the satrapies were required to pay. A complete list is preserved in the catalog of Herodotus.....The majority of the satraps were of Persian origin and were members of the royal house or the six great noble families. These satraps were personally picked by Darius to monitor these provinces, which were divided into sub-provinces with their own governors which were chosen either by the royal court or by the satrap.".....Shahbazi, Shapur (1996), "Darius I the Great", Encyclopedia Iranica, 7,

"Each of the eight petals in the outer part of Shambhala contain 120 million villages. These 960 million villages are divided into kingdoms numbering ten million villages each, with each kingdom ruled by a satrap, or local governor, making a total of ninety-six satraps.....The people who live in all these countless cities and counties have great wealth, happiness, and no sickness. The crops of good and everyone passes their with Dharma. As all the kings [satraps] are religious one, there is not even a sign of non-virtue or evil in these lands. Even the words “war” and “enmity” are unknown. The happiness and joy can compete with that of the gods . ". . http://www.shambhala.mn/Shambhala-Thangka/shambhala-thangka.html

"The word "satrap" originates ultimately (via Ancient Greek and Latin) from Old Persian xšaçapāvan ("protector of the province"), Sanskrit क्षत्रपम् (kshatrapam or kshtrapa), from xšaça ("realm" or "province") and pāvan ("protector"). In Greek, the word was rendered as σατράπης, satrápēs (later borrowed into Latin as satrapes), from a Western Iranian cognate xšaθrapā(van). In modern Persian the descendant of xšaθrapāvan is شهربان (shahrbān)"

"The first large scale use of satrapies, or provinces, originates from the conception of the first Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great, beginning at around 530 BCE. However, Provincial organization originated during the Median era from at least 648 BCE.....Up to the time of the conquest of Media by Cyrus the Great, emperors ruled the conquered lands, through client kings and governors. The chief difference was that in Persian culture the concept of kingship was indivisible from divinity: divine authority validated the divine right of kings. The twenty satraps established by Cyrus were never kings, but viceroys ruling in the king's name, although in political reality many grabbed any chance to carve themselves an independent power base. Darius the Great gave the satrapies a definitive organization, increased their number to twenty-three and fixed their annual tribute (Behistun inscription)."

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

John Hopkins.....Northern New Mexico….February 2013

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