Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Great Khorasan Road & The Silk Route

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

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"The name "Khorasan" is derived from Middle Persian khwar (meaning "sun") and āsān (or ayan literally meaning "to come" or "coming" or "about to come"), hence meaning "land where the sun rises" ......The Persian word Khāvar-zamīn (Persian: خاور زمین‎), meaning "the eastern land", has also been used."

"Bactra was first inhabited c. 5000 BCE which comprised a village and a fortress. It became an important stop along the Great Khorasan Road trade route, better known as the Silk Road, which was the major avenue for trade for close to 3000 years (the designation "silk road" was first coined in 1877 by the German geographer Baron Ferdinand von Richthofen in reference to the trade of Chinese silk). As the Khorasan Road was not the only one used in trade, and silk was not the only commodity traded, many modern scholars prefer "silk routes" as the name for trade routes, with Khorasan Road being only one of many."....The site was a Sumerian settlement first inhabited c. 5000 BCE which comprised a village and a fortress. It became an important stop along the Great Khorasan Road trade route, better known as the Silk Road, which was the major avenue for trade for close to 3000 years (the designation "silk road" was first coined in 1877 by the German geographer Baron Ferdinand von Richthofen in reference to the trade of Chinese silk). As the Khorasan Road was not the only one used in trade, and silk was not the only commodity traded, many modern scholars prefer "silk routes" as the name for trade routes, with Khorasan Road being only one of many."

"Extending 4,000 miles (6,500 km), the Silk Road gets its name from the lucrative Chinese silk trade along it, which began during the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

"Given the geographical location of Panjikent and the other towns mentioned, all positioned on the main silk route, it was obvious that travellers from the Far East and the western world would carry their culture with them when travelling or settling there. This resulted in the syncretic local variant of Zoroastrianism, depicted so richly with statues and wall paintings of god-like figures, reminiscent of Buddhist and Hindu iconography, which has not been found in other Zoroastrian areas. One Tajik archaeologist believes that many of the wall paintings are depictions of the Zoroastrian angels, the amesha spenta, and of those who give their names to the months and to each day of the month. He is hoping to produce a calendar of these particular wall paintings. This art form is a typical feature of Sogdian Zoroastrianism and may give a clue to what the historian Tabari is referring when he speaks of 'the idols of the fire-worshippers', since elsewhere early Zoroastrians are not known to have had any visual icons.".....http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/rss/22-1_109.pdf

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

John Hopkins.....Northern New Mexico….June 2014

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